Connect with us

Breaking News

US Supreme Court Rules That Civil Rights Laws Protect LGBTQ Employees From Discrimination

Published

on

The Supreme Court has ruled that LGBTQ employees are protected under federal employment discrimination laws in a landmark decision.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that existing federal law forbids job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, a major victory for advocates of gay rights — and a surprising one from an increasingly conservative court.

The decision said Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which makes it illegal for employers to discriminate because of a person’s sex, among other factors, also covers sexual orientation. It upheld rulings from lower courts that said sexual orientation discrimination was a form of sex discrimination.

Across the nation, 21 states have their own laws prohibiting job discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Seven more provide that protection only to public employees. Those laws remain in force, but Monday’s ruling means federal law now provides similar protection for LGBT employees in the rest of the country.

Gay rights groups considered the case a highly significant one, even more important than the fight to get the right to marry, because nearly every LGBT adult has or needs a job.

They conceded that sexual orientation was not on the minds of anyone in Congress when the civil rights law was passed. But they said when an employer fires a male employee for dating men, but not a female employee who dates men, that violates the law.

The ruling was a victory for Gerald Bostock, who was fired from a county job in Georgia after he joined a gay softball team, and the relatives of Donald Zarda, a skydiving instructor who was fired after he told a female client not to worry about being strapped tightly to him during a jump, because he was “100 percent gay.” Zarda died before the case reached the Supreme Court. The ruling was also a victory for Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman fired from the funeral home where she was employed, simply due to her identity as a transgender woman and her transition at her place of employment. Stephens also died just days before her existence among millions of other transgender Americans were honored in the workplace.

The Trump administration had urged the court to rule that Title VII does not cover cases like those, in a reversal from the position the government took during the Obama administration.

“The ordinary meaning of ‘sex’ is biologically make or female; it does not include sexual orientation,” the Justice Department said. “An employer who discriminates against employees in same-sex relationships thus does not violate Title VII as long as it treats men in same-sex relationships the same as women in same-sex relationships.”

The case came to the Supreme Court that no longer includes Anthony Kennedy, who wrote all of the court’s significant gay rights decisions. He was succeeded by Brett Kavanaugh, who is generally more conservative than Kennedy.

The landmark LGBT rights ruling is here or below.

This story is breaking and will be updated.

Breaking News

Biden selects California Sen. Kamala Harris as running mate

Published

on

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden named California Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate on Tuesday, making history by selecting the first Black woman to compete on a major party’s presidential ticket and acknowledging the vital role Black voters will play in his bid to defeat President Donald Trump.

In choosing Harris, Biden is embracing a former rival from the Democratic primary who is familiar with the unique rigor of a national campaign. Harris, a 55-year-old first-term senator, is also one of the party’s most prominent figures and quickly became a top contender for the No. 2 spot after her own White House campaign ended.

Continue Reading

Breaking News

Biden selects California Sen. Kamala Harris as running mate

Published

on

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden named California Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate on Tuesday, making history by selecting the first Black woman to compete on a major party’s presidential ticket and acknowledging the vital role Black voters will play in his bid to defeat President Donald Trump.

In choosing Harris, Biden is embracing a former rival from the Democratic primary who is familiar with the unique rigor of a national campaign. Harris, a 55-year-old first-term senator, is also one of the party’s most prominent figures and quickly became a top contender for the No. 2 spot after her own White House campaign ended.

Continue Reading

Breaking News

Britain Suspends Extradition Treaty With Hong Kong

Published

on

Britain has suspended its extradition treaty with Hong Kong dispute following the introduction of China’s national security law.

Britain says the new national security law in Hong Kong breaches agreements made before the handover of the former British colony.

Speaking on Sunday, British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab told the BBC that it was clear the Uighur minority in China had suffered abuses of their human rights.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson says that the government has “concerns about the treatment of the Uyghur minority obviously, about the human rights abuses,” he promised a “tough” yet balanced approach towards the world’s second largest economy, without abandoning the UK’s “policy of engagement.”

US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo will arrive in London later today for talks with government officials.

Continue Reading

Popular

Copyright © 2018 News This Second