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NHS To Build Two More Nightingale Hospitals

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Two NHS Nightingale hospitals are to be built in Bristol and Harrogate, NHS England has announced.

NHS chief executive, Sir Simon Stevens, confirmed that the hospitals will provide up to 1,500 beds.

Such sites are being built to add ‘surge capacity’ to existing hospitals and local services should they need them during the peak of coronavirus.

The University of the West of England in Bristol will have a capacity of 1,000 patients whereas the Harrogate Convention centre will be able to care for up to 500.

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The hospitals will serve their surrounding regions.

Sir Simon Stevens, NHS chief executive, said:

“We’re giving the go ahead to these additional sites, hoping they may not be needing but preparing in case they are. But that will partly depend on continuing public support for measures to reduce growth in the infection rate by staying at home to save lives.”

The announcement comes as London’s NHS Nightingale hospital opens today, the site has a capacity of 3,500 patients and covers 90,000 square meters, the equivalent of roughly a dozen football pitches.

Sir Stevens, said: “It’s nothing short of extraordinary that this new hospital in London has been established from scratch in less than a fortnight.”

“Now we are gearing up to repeat that feat at another four sites across the country to add to the surge capacity in current NHS hospitals.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said:

“The NHS and the military have achieved something extraordinary in setting up NHS Nightingale, London in only a matter of days .It is testament to their hard work and dedication that an additional four hospitals will be rolled out across the nation.”

On Wednesday, the Health Secretary posted a video to social media thanking everyone involved.

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LOCKDOWNS IN EUROPE ARE A WARNING TO THE UNITED STATES

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The coronavirus is surging again in Europe, forcing harsh new restrictions in London and Paris as governments carefully weigh their next steps. That’s bad news for the region’s economic recovery — and puts the United States on notice ahead of a difficult winter.

What’s happening: Paris has imposed an overnight curfew. In London, people from different households are banned from meeting indoors. The measures are an attempt to stem the rapid rise in Covid-19 cases across the continent as hospital capacity again becomes a concern.

Stocks in London, Paris, Milan and Frankfurt sold off sharply on Thursday before rebounding Friday. Markets aren’t tanking like they did in March, but the quick change in climate still presents a cautionary tale.

Bank of America’s economists in Europe put it simply in a note to clients on Friday: “Yes, it is bad.”

“Localized and surgical restrictions could become more disruptive if they keep mounting up,” they said. “Precautionary savings, which are already large, could increase further driven by virus related uncertainty. And voluntary social distancing can easily amplify the economic impact of the resurgence of the virus.”

The size of the economic impact of the fresh measures is difficult to ascertain, especially given the patchwork response in countries like the United Kingdom, where cities such as Liverpool face even tighter rules than London.

“Tracking the scale and scope of restrictions will be [of] utmost importance going forward,” said Deutsche Bank economist Sanjay Raja. He’s sticking with his prediction for 2% growth in the United Kingdom between October and December, but said that if any more restrictions are imposed, the economy could completely stall.

Allianz now expects key European economies to contract again in the final quarter of the year, with Spain’s economy shrinking 1.3% compared to the previous quarter and France’s economy shedding 1.1%.

Big picture: There’s little reason to think that the challenge facing leaders in Europe — act decisively and try to stave off a worsening health crisis, or take moderate steps that could protect fragile economic gains — is purely a local phenomenon.

See here: New York City is grappling with a Covid-19 resurgence in some neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens by closing non-essential businesses and schools in certain areas, an attempt to avoid broader shutdowns for now.

In the United States, the one-week average of new daily cases has moved above 53,000, an increase of more than 55% in just over a month, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

The Back-to-Normal Index from CNN Business and Moody’s Analytics shows that the US recovery has effectively plateaued since mid-September. Yet Europe demonstrates how quickly the situation can go into reverse.

Investor insight: European stocks have enjoyed heightened demand from investors in recent months. Money managers pointed to Europe’s relative control of the virus after the spring, while lauding an agreement among EU leaders to raise 800 billion euros ($938 billion) for rercovery efforts. Without the first part of that equation, however, the region could struggle.

Netflix is having a killer year. Can it keep it up?

It won’t come as a surprise to anyone who’s been hunkering down at home that Netflix is having a knockout year.

While movie theaters are quickly running out of cash, Netflix is thriving. The streaming service added 26 million subscribers in the first half of the year as the cultural conversation centered on shows like “Tiger King.” Last quarter, Netflix more than doubled its profit compared to the same period a year earlier.

Watch the stock: Shares have skyrocketed 64% in 2020, while the S&P 500 has gained closer to 8%.

Investors will tune in Tuesday to see if Netflix can maintain momentum when it reports results for the July to September quarter. The company said in July that it expected to bring about 2.5 million subscribers during that period.

Bank of America analysts thinks subscriber numbers could be weaker this quarter given increased competition from players like Disney+ and NBC’s Peacock, the return of live sports and a predicted increase in people cancelling subscriptions.

Even so it raised its target for the stock to $670, a 26% rise over Friday’s closing price, due to faith in the company’s long-term strategy.

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Whitmer says Trump ‘inciting’ domestic terrorism

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Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer called out President Donald Trump on Sunday for incendiary comments he made about her during a weekend campaign rally, saying the President’s heightened rhetoric just days after authorities foiled a plot by extremists to kidnap her is “inciting this kind of domestic terrorism.”

But as Whitmer, a Democrat, pleaded with Trump to “bring down the heat,” the President’s daughter-in-law Lara Trump described the President’s calls to jail the governor as him “having fun,” during an interview with CNN on Sunday.

“You know, it’s incredibly disturbing that the President of the United States, 10 days after a plot to kidnap, put me on trial and execute me, 10 days after that was uncovered, the President is at it again and inspiring and incentivizing and inciting this kind of domestic terrorism,” Whitmer said in an interview on NBC.

“It is wrong. It’s got to end. It is dangerous, not just for me and my family, but for public servants everywhere who are doing their jobs and trying to protect their fellow Americans. People of goodwill on both sides of the aisle need to step up and call this out and bring the heat down,” she added.

During a rally Saturday in Michigan, Trump accused Whitmer, whom he has previously called “a dictator,” of unnecessarily locking down her state as she fought the coronavirus pandemic. That led his crowd to break into a chant of “Lock her up!” a little more than a week after federal authorities revealed a plot by extremists to kidnap Whitmer and overthrow the government.

Rather than condemning the derailed plot — which led to terrorism, conspiracy and weapons charges against more than a dozen men — or discouraging that kind of divisive language, Trump responded to the cheer by saying, “Lock them all up” — drawing on his authoritarian rhetoric about jailing his political opponents by adding Hillary Clinton and the Biden family into the mix.

Asked about the chants by CNN’s Jake Tapper on State of the Union, Lara Trump, who serves as a senior adviser for the Trump campaign, downplayed the comments and dismissed concerns about their potential impact.

“Well, look, he wasn’t doing anything, I don’t think, to provoke people to threaten this woman at all,” she said, referring to Whitmer. “He was having fun at a Trump rally.”

During his rally Saturday, Trump also complained that Whitmer said publicly that his refusal to denounce White supremacists, extremists and hate groups has emboldened activists like those who allegedly planned the foiled attack against her.

“I guess they said she was threatened, right?” Trump said, seeming to doubt the specifics of the case and underplaying the violence it could have entailed. “She was threatened, and she blamed me — she blamed me, and our people were the ones that worked with her people, so let’s see what happens.”

Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware called Lara Trump’s comments “troubling” during an appearance on “State of the Union” later Sunday, telling Tapper that the President’s language creates a clear contrast between him and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

“If that means that for our President ‘fun’ is fueling division and encouraging folks to say and do things that are threatening and completely inappropriate, well that’s a reminder of what kind of president we currently have, in sharp contrast to Joe Biden, someone who can and will bring our country together,” Coons said.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also criticized Trump for his rally comments, saying in an interview with ABC on Sunday that he was being “irresponsible” with his rhetoric.

“The President has to realize the words of the president of the United States weigh a ton. And in that political dialogue, to inject fear tactics into it, especially (about) a woman governor and her family, is so irresponsible,” said Pelosi, a California Democrat.

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Businesses Grapple With Tighter Restrictions

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Tighter lockdown restrictions for Liverpool have local businesses on edge, many are growing increasing frustrated as they grapple with a partial closure of the local economy.

‘My worst fears are coming true’ said Jez Lamb, founder of the Merseyside-based craft beer marketplace, Beers @ No.42.

Mr Lamb feels that Liverpool based businesses such as his are on the front line of infection rates, he said that “as a business owner, you naturally want the whole economy to be open, but at the same time people’s lives are also at risk.”

An ominous winter lies ahead.

Jez Lamb

The new restrictions he says “could see an economy that is already on life support start to flatline”. Adding that an ominous winter lies ahead.

Judicial Review

A judicial review claim has been brought against the government by solicitors acting on behalf of the nightclub chain G-A-Y. The chain has nightclubs in Manchester and London.

The claim challenges the 10pm curfew on the hospitality sector.

Simon Elcock, Partner at DMH Stallard, said the night time industry was being used as a scapegoat for the rise in infections and that there is a growing anger about the restrictions’ ;

Speaking on the legal action, he said;

“The claim is at an early stage and will face significant hurdles if it is to succeed, including the fact that claims of this kind, unusually in our system, require the Court’s permission to proceed and many are knocked out at this ‘permission stage’. 

“These hurdles are likely to be exacerbated where infection rates in many parts of the UK are continuing to rise and further government sanctions are expected imminently.

“Perhaps this challenge is as much about keeping this issue high on the agenda for both the public and the government, as it is about the legal position and prospects of success.”

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