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Election 2020

Joe Biden Raised $6.3 Million In First 24 Hours Of Presidential Campaign

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WASHINGTON—Joe Biden faced questions about his handling of the 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Clarence Thomas, as the former vice president sat Friday for his first televised interview sincelaunching his presidential campaign.


Mr. Biden said in an interview with ABC’s “The View” that he was sorry for the manner in which the Senate Judiciary Committee treated Anita Hill, the law professor who had accused Mr. Thomas of sexual harassment when they worked together years earlier.

Mr. Biden, who served as the committee’s chairman, faced criticism at the time that he was too accommodating to Mr. Thomas and failed to protect Ms. Hill, who is black, from a series of harsh questions from the committee, which was composed entirely of white men. Mr. Thomas denied all of the accusations during the hearing, calling them false.

“If you go back and look at what I said and didn’t say, I don’t think I treated her badly,” Mr. Biden said in Friday’s interview. “What I couldn’t figure out to do, and we still haven’t figured it out: How do you stop people from asking inflammatory questions? How do you stop these character assassinations?”

Mr. Biden added: “There are a lot of mistakes made across the board, and for those, I apologize, that we may have been able to do and conduct it better. But I believed Dr. Hill from the beginning, from the beginning, and I said it.”

Mr. Biden spoke in private earlier this month with Ms. Hill and said he told her he was sorry for the way she was treated.

Ms. Hill said in an interview Wednesday with the New York Times that she wasn’t satisfied with what he said to her. Ms. Hill, a Brandeis University professor of social policy, law and women’s, gender and sexuality studies, didn’t respond to requests for comment Thursday and Friday.

Mr. Biden also stopped short Friday of offering a full-throated apology to the seven women who came forward in recent weeks to accuse him of invading their personal space in his interactions with them. None of the women have accused him of sexual harassment.Former Vice President Joe Biden announced his 2020 campaign, in what will be his third run for president. WSJ’s Gerald F. Seib takes a look at what he brings to the table and what are his liabilities.

Mr. Biden said he needed to be “more cognizant” of his interactions with men and women and their personal space.

When co-host Joy Behar noted that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi “wants you to say, ‘I’m sorry I invaded your space,’” Mr. Biden responded: “So I invaded your space…I’m sorry this happened.”

“But I’m not sorry in the sense that I think I did anything that was intentionally designed to do anything wrong or be inappropriate,” he said. “It was inappropriate that I didn’t understand.”

Mr. Biden opened his third bid for the presidency on Thursday, entering a field of 20 major Democrats vying to challenge President Trump.

The 76-year-old former vice president declined to commit to serving only one term if elected, adding that he might get only one term if he wins.

(Reporting by Wall Street Journal)

Election 2020

Democratic Debate: Night 1 [LIVE]

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Election 2020

One Moore Time: Roy Moore Does It Again

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Disgraced State Supreme Court justice and accused child molester Roy Moore announced on Thursday that he is officially running for Alabama’s Senate seat against Democrat Doug Jones…again.

During a rambling, aggrieved speech in which he name-checked Robert Mueller, Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and George Soros, Moore—who infamously lost the 2017 special election to Jones—painted himself as the victim of a global smear campaign who would nevertheless buck the overwhelming opposition to his candidacy and win in 2020. 

Claiming that he’d like to focus on “more personal contact” with voters this time around (yikes), Moore reiterated his claims of innocence in the face of multiple allegations that he’d preyed on young women during the 1970s. 

Moore saved much of his venom for the establishment Republican Party, which he blamed for pushing President Trump to oppose his second Senate run. In late May, Trump publicly urged Moore not to run; he staunchly supported Moore’s candidacy in 2017, even after multiple women accused Moore of sexual assault and harassment. 

Now that Moore has officially declared his intent to run again, all eyes will turn to former Attorney General and—more pertinently—former Alabama senator Jeff Sessions, who has been reportedly thinking about recapturing his old seat.

“Sessions, I don’t think, has ruled [running for his old seat] out,” Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby told the Washington Post, when asked about the possibility that Sessions may join the Republican primary. “I’ve talked to him about it. I think if he ran, he would be a formidable candidate, formidable.” 

In addition to the allegations of sexual assault, Moore’s 2017 campaign was punctuated by rampant homophobia, bizarre philo-semitism, and at least one instance of a burnished firearm. He has since gone on to sue comedian Sacha Baron Cohen after Cohen mocked him during a taping of his Who is America? for Showtime. 

Reporting By Splinter News

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Election 2020

A “Schock For Congress?”: Aaron Schock Possibly Making New Run For Congress

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Scandal-ridden former Republican representative, Aaron Schock, may be planning to run for Congress again.

A Statement of Organization was filed last week with the Federal Election Commission for the “Schock for Congress” campaign, LGBTQNation reported.

Schock, 37, is listed as the campaign treasurer upon the documents, even though the campaign reportedly has no funds.

The politician served as a US Representative from Illinois from 2009 to 2015. However he resigned after being accused of misusing campaign and public funds.

Ethics investigation

He was also the subject of a congressional ethics investigation and was indicted by a federal grand jury.

Federal prosecutors dropped charges earlier this year in exchange for paying $110,000 in restitution and taxes.

At the time, the Republican told CBS News that he hadn’t ruled out the possibility of returning to politics at some point in the future.

‘At 37-years-old, I don’t think I’ll ever say never,” said Schock. He added that he had “enjoyed being out of politics the last four years.’

Schock has proved a controversial figure among the LGBTI community. While in office, he campaigned against a number of issues including gays in the military, marriage equality, and LGBTI hate crimes.

However, although not openly gay, photographs have been widely circulated apparently showing Schock making out with a man in public while putting his hand down the man’s shorts.

(Reporting by Gay Star News)

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