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Federal Appeals Court Approves Ohio Law Blocking Public Money To Planned Parenthood

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WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 27: An anti-abortion advocate rallies outside of the Supreme Court during the March for Life, January 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. This year marks the 44th anniversary of the landmark Roe v. Wade Supreme Court case, which established a woman's constitutional right to an abortion. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

CINCINNATI (AP) — A divided federal appeals court has upheld an Ohio anti-abortion law that blocks public money for Planned Parenthood.

The Tuesday ruling by the full 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a lower court ruling and could result in an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Ohio law targeted funding that Planned Parenthood receives through the state’s health department. That money is mostly from the federal government and supports education and prevention programs.

The law bars such funds from entities that perform or promote abortions.

Phone and email messages were left with Planned Parenthood seeking comment.

A three-judge panel of the court had agreed with the lower-court ruling, prompting then-Attorney General Mike DeWine last year to seek a full-court hearing. The Republican took office this year as governor.

The ruling by the full 6th Circuit Court of Appeals as filed below:

Abortion

Federal Judge Issues Restraining Order Preventing Kentucky From Implementing Heartbeat Law

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A federal judge on Wednesday has issued a temporary restraining order that blocks a Kentucky law that banned abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, which typically happens around six weeks into pregnancy, before many women know they are pregnant.

The measure, which was signed into law on Friday by the state’s Republican governor, Matt Bevin, and was set to take effect immediately, was poised to become one of the strictest anti-abortion laws in the country.

But late on Wednesday, the judge, David J. Hale of the Western District of Kentucky, ruled the law was potentially unconstitutional. He halted enforcement under the Temporary Restraining Order for at least 14 days to “prevent irreparable harm” until he could hold a hearing.

The temporary restraining order is in effect since 5:00 PM CT, and will be in effect until 5:00 PM CT on Wednesday, April 3rd.

Read the TRO issued moments ago below:

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Abortion

Federal Judge Blocks Kentucky Heartbeat Law Which Would Have Banned Abortion In The State

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A federal judge on Friday temporarily blocked a Kentucky law that banned abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, which typically happens around six weeks into pregnancy, before many women know they are pregnant.

The measure, which was signed into law on Friday by the state’s Republican governor, Matt Bevin, and was set to take effect immediately, was poised to become one of the strictest anti-abortion laws in the country.

But late on Friday, the judge, David J. Hale of the Western District of Kentucky, ruled the law was potentially unconstitutional. He halted enforcement for at least 14 days to “prevent irreparable harm” until he could hold a hearing.

Read the court ruling below:

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Abortion

Georgia State House Backs Anti-Abortion Heartbeat Bill That Would Essentially Outlaw Abortion

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ATLANTA (AP) —  Georgia joined a string of states moving to enact tough abortion restrictions, as the state House passed a ban on most abortions after a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

During tense debate Thursday night, several Democratic lawmakers opposed to the bill turned their back to its author, Republican Rep. Ed Setzler. Earlier in the day, some handed out wire coat hangers in reference to unsafe home abortions.

Women in Georgia can currently seek an abortion up to 20 weeks into a pregnancy. A fetal heartbeat is generally detectable at around six weeks, before many women know they are pregnant.

The bill makes exceptions in the case of rape and incest, but only when the woman files a police report first, as well as when a fetus is deemed not compatible with life.

It now goes to the state Senate. Republican Gov. Brian Kemp backs the measure.

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