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Eastside High School in Lancaster, California on lockdown

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Update:    EHS Principal:  “There was an unsubstantiated threat that was investigated and no threat was found. We take all threats seriously and thank you for your patience.”

Eastside High School in Lancaster, California is on lockdown following reports of a possible shooter spreading on social media.

The school serves 2592 students in grades 9-12

The Principal for Eastside High School tweeted a short time ago:

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Court Rulings

Federal Appeals Court Backs California Laws To Protect Immigrants

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Thursday kept in place three California laws intended to protect immigrants, continuing the state’s efforts to be a national leader in opposing Trump administration policies.


The court upheld lower court rulings denying the Trump administration’s request to block law enforcement from providing release dates and personal information of people in jail, as well as to throw out a law barring employers from allowing immigration officials on their premises unless the officials have a warrant.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected U.S. District Judge John Mendez’s reasoning last year for denying a portion of the third law, which requires the state to review detention facilities where immigrants are held. It ruled that the section requiring the state to review circumstances surrounding the apprehension and transfer of detainees puts an impermissible burden on the federal government.

But the appellate panel said Mendez can consider rejecting a preliminary injunction for that section on other legal grounds.

The U.S. Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who has repeatedly sued the Trump administration mostly over immigration and environmental decisions, said the ruling shows that states’ rights “continue to thrive.”

“We continue to prove in California that the rule of law not only stands for something but that people cannot act outside of it,” Becerra said in a statement.

California officials have said the immigration laws promote trust between immigrant communities and law enforcement, while the administration argued the state is allowing dangerous criminals on the streets.

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Mueller Report

Trump Attempted To Choke Russian Probe, Oust Mueller, Redacted Report States

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Special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Public at last, special counsel Robert Mueller’s report revealed to a waiting nation Thursday that President Donald Trump tried to seize control of the Russia probe and force Mueller’s removal to stop him from investigating potential obstruction of justice by the president. Trump was largely thwarted by those around him.


Mueller laid out multiple episodes in which Trump directed others to influence or curtail the Russia investigation after the special counsel’s appointment in May 2017. Those efforts “were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests,” Mueller wrote.

After nearly two years, the two-volume, 448-page redacted report made for riveting reading.

In one particularly dramatic moment, Mueller reported that Trump was so agitated at the special counsel’s appointment on May 17, 2017, that he slumped back in his chair and declared: “Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I’m f—ed.”

With that, Trump set out to save himself.

In June of that year, Mueller wrote, Trump directed White House Counsel Don McGahn to call Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who oversaw the probe, and say that Mueller must be ousted because he had conflicts of interest. McGahn refused — deciding he would rather resign than trigger a potential crisis akin to the Saturday Night Massacre of Watergate firings fame.

Two days later, the president made another attempt to alter the course of the investigation, meeting with former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski and dictating a message for him to relay to then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The message: Sessions would publicly call the investigation “very unfair” to the president, declare Trump did nothing wrong and say that Mueller should limit his probe to “investigating election meddling for future elections.” The message was never delivered.

The report’s bottom line largely tracked the findings revealed in Attorney General William Barr’s four-page memo released a month ago — no collusion with Russia, no clear verdict on obstruction — but it added troubling layers of detailabout Trump’s efforts to thwart the investigation. Looking ahead, both sides were already using the findings to amplify well-rehearsed arguments about Trump’s conduct, Republicans casting him as a victim of harassment and Democrats depicting the president as stepping far over the line to derail the investigation.

The Justice Department released a redacted version of the report about 90 minutes after Attorney General William Barr offered his own final assessment of the findings at a testy Justice Department news conference. The nation, Congress and Trump’s White House consumed the report voraciously — online, via a compact disc delivered to legislators and in loose-leaf binders distributed to reporters.

The release represented a moment of closure nearly two years in the making but also the starting bell for a new round of partisan warfare.

A defiant Trump pronounced it “a good day” and tweeted a photo declaring “Game Over” in a typeface mimicking the “Game of Thrones” logo.

Top Republicans in Congress saw vindication, too.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said it was time to move on from Democrats’ effort to “vilify a political opponent.” The California lawmaker said the report failed to deliver the “imaginary evidence” incriminating Trump that Democrats had sought.

But Democrats cried foul over Barr’s preemptive press conference and said the report revealed troubling details about Trump’s conduct in the White House.

“Even in its incomplete form, the Mueller report outlines disturbing evidence that President Trump engaged in obstruction of justice and other misconduct,” said House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler.

He sent a letter to the Justice Department requesting that Mueller himself testify before his panel “no later than May 23” and said he’d be issuing a subpoena for the full special counsel report and the underlying materials. Barr said he wouldn’t object to Mueller testifying.

Trump himself was never questioned in person, but the report’s appendix includes 12 pages of his written responses to queries from Mueller’s team.

Mueller deemed Trump’s written answers — rife with iterations of “I don’t recall” — to be “inadequate.” The team considered issuing a subpoena to force the president to appear in person, but decided against it after weighing the likelihood of a long legal battle.

In his written answers, Trump said his comment during a 2016 political rally asking Russian hackers to help find emails scrubbed from Clinton’s private server was made “in jest and sarcastically” and that he did not recall being told during the campaign of any Russian effort to infiltrate or hack computer systems.

But Mueller said that within five hours of Trump’s comment, Russian military intelligence officers targeted email accounts connected to Clinton’s office.

Mueller evaluated 10 episodes for possible obstruction of justice, and said he could not conclusively determine that Trump had committed criminal obstruction. The episodes included Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey, the president’s directive to subordinates to have Mueller fired and efforts to encourage witnesses not to cooperate.

The president’s lawyers have said Trump’s conduct fell within his constitutional powers, but Mueller’s team deemed the episodes deserving of scrutiny for potential criminal acts.

As for the question of whether the Trump campaign had colluded with Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign, Mueller wrote, “While the investigation identified numerous links between individuals with ties to the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump Campaign, the evidence was not sufficient to support criminal charges.”

Workers at a Russian troll farm contacted Trump’s campaign, claiming to be political activists for conservative grassroots organizations, and asked for signs and other campaign materials to use at rallies. While volunteers provided some of those materials — and set aside a number of signs — investigators don’t believe any Trump campaign officials knew the requests were coming from foreign nationals, Mueller wrote.

Mueller also said there wasn’t sufficient evidence to charge any campaign official with working as an unregistered foreign agent of Russia or violating federal campaign finance laws.

Josh Blackman, a professor at the South Texas College of Law Houston, stressed that Mueller didn’t think the president’s obligations to run the executive branch entitled him to absolute immunity from prosecution. But to find that the president obstructed justice, he said, Mueller would have needed much clearer evidence that the president acted solely with “corrupt intent.”

“The evidence was sort of muddled,” Blackman said, adding that the president’s actions had multiple motivations.

Trump’s written responses addressed no questions about obstruction of justice, as was part of an agreement with Trump’s legal team.

He told Mueller he had “no recollection” of learning in advance about the much-scrutinized Trump Tower meeting between campaign officials and a Russian lawyer. He also said he had no recollection of knowledge about emails setting up the meeting that promised dirt on Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

He broadly denied knowing of any foreign government trying to help his campaign, including the Russian government. He said he was aware of some reports that Russian President Vladimir Putin had made “complimentary statements” about him.

It wasn’t just Trump under the microscope. But Mueller wrote that he believed prosecutors would be unlikely to meet the burden of proof to show that Donald Trump Jr. and other participants in the Trump Tower meeting “had general knowledge that their conduct was unlawful.” Nor did Mueller’s probe develop evidence that they knew that foreign contributions to campaigns were illegal or other particulars of federal law.

Barr’s contention that the report contained only “limited redactions” applied more to the obstruction of justice section than its look at Russian meddling in the 2016 campaign.

Nearly two-thirds of the Russia section —135 pages out of 199— had some form of color-coded redaction. Blocked sections appeared on 22 of 182 pages in the obstruction section, and even showed up in the report’s table of contents. Barr had said that he would redact grand jury information and material related to ongoing investigation, privacy and intelligence.

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Mueller declined to prosecute Jeff Sessions for perjury

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Special counsel Robert Mueller’s team declined to prosecute then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions for making false statements or committing perjury to Congress during his confirmation hearing in part because of the inexact wording of the questions.

Sessions testified that he did not have communications with Russians during the campaign.

It was later revealed Sessions interacted with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak at the Republican National Convention and a campaign event at the Mayflower Hotel.

“The evidence is not sufficient to prove that Sessions gave knowingly false answers to Russia-related questions in light of the wording and context of those questions,” the report said.

April 18, 2019 2:05 pm
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20:26
Responding to Mueller's Queries, Trump Said More Than 30 Times He Didn't Recall or Remember

In November 2018, the president submitted written responses in which he on more than 30 occasions said he "does not 'recall' or 'remember' or have an 'independent recollection,' " the report details. The next month, Mr. Mueller told the president's lawyers the written answers were insufficient and again requested an in-person interview. Mr. Trump declined.

NewsThisSecond
20:25
Jeff Sessions Carried Resignation Letter Every Time He Went to White House

Mr. Sessions offered his resignation letter after Mr. Trump lashed out at him following Mr. Mueller's appointment, and the president ultimately rejected it. But the public attacks on Mr. Sessions did not stop.

The report says the they apparently became so taxing on the attorney general that he prepared another resignation letter and for the rest of the year carried it with him in his pocket every time he went to the White House.

NewsThisSecond
20:21
Trump saw his campaign as an "informercial" for the business, Cohen told special counsel
 

In former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen’s extensive interviews with investigators, he said he couldn’t remember anyone discussing the political implications of landing a Russian deal during the campaign.

But he did say that Trump told him participating in the presidential race would be a significant "infomercial" for Trump-branded properties.

NewsThisSecond
20:21
Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was interviewed about lunch he had with Trump

The special counsel team interviewed former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in February 2019, two weeks after the release of his book, according to Robert Mueller’s report.

The focus of the Christie interview appears to have been a White House lunch he had with President Donald Trump on February 14, 2017, one day after the resignation of Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn. Christie also recounted that meal in his book.

Here's what the report says about the interaction:

"Now that we fired Flynn, the Russia thing is over,” Trump told Christie, according to Christie.

Christie laughed and responded, "No way."

Christie continued: "This Russia thing is far from over" and "[w]e'll be here on Valentine's Day 2018 talking about this." 

“Christie told the President not to talk about the investigation even if he was frustrated at times,” according to the report. Christie also told Trump that he “would never be able to get rid of Flynn, ‘like gum on the bottom of your shoe.’”

According to the report, Trump also asked Christie twice to reach out to former FBI Director James Comey to say that Trump "really like[s] him. Tell him he's part of the team." Christie told the special counsel he never intended to fulfill those requests.

“He thought the President's request was ‘nonsensical,’” the report says, “and Christie did not want to put Comey in the position of having to receive such a phone call.” 

NewsThisSecond
20:21
Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was interviewed about lunch he had with Trump

The special counsel team interviewed former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in February 2019, two weeks after the release of his book, according to Robert Mueller’s report.

The focus of the Christie interview appears to have been a White House lunch he had with President Donald Trump on February 14, 2017, one day after the resignation of Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn. Christie also recounted that meal in his book.

Here's what the report says about the interaction:

"Now that we fired Flynn, the Russia thing is over,” Trump told Christie, according to Christie.

Christie laughed and responded, "No way."

Christie continued: "This Russia thing is far from over" and "[w]e'll be here on Valentine's Day 2018 talking about this." 

“Christie told the President not to talk about the investigation even if he was frustrated at times,” according to the report. Christie also told Trump that he “would never be able to get rid of Flynn, ‘like gum on the bottom of your shoe.’”

According to the report, Trump also asked Christie twice to reach out to former FBI Director James Comey to say that Trump "really like[s] him. Tell him he's part of the team." Christie told the special counsel he never intended to fulfill those requests.

“He thought the President's request was ‘nonsensical,’” the report says, “and Christie did not want to put Comey in the position of having to receive such a phone call.” 

NewsThisSecond
20:21
Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was interviewed about lunch he had with Trump

The special counsel team interviewed former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in February 2019, two weeks after the release of his book, according to Robert Mueller’s report.

The focus of the Christie interview appears to have been a White House lunch he had with President Donald Trump on February 14, 2017, one day after the resignation of Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn. Christie also recounted that meal in his book.

Here's what the report says about the interaction:

"Now that we fired Flynn, the Russia thing is over,” Trump told Christie, according to Christie.

Christie laughed and responded, "No way."

Christie continued: "This Russia thing is far from over" and "[w]e'll be here on Valentine's Day 2018 talking about this." 

“Christie told the President not to talk about the investigation even if he was frustrated at times,” according to the report. Christie also told Trump that he “would never be able to get rid of Flynn, ‘like gum on the bottom of your shoe.’”

According to the report, Trump also asked Christie twice to reach out to former FBI Director James Comey to say that Trump "really like[s] him. Tell him he's part of the team." Christie told the special counsel he never intended to fulfill those requests.

“He thought the President's request was ‘nonsensical,’” the report says, “and Christie did not want to put Comey in the position of having to receive such a phone call.” 

NewsThisSecond
19:50
Rep. Jerry Nadler Issues Subpoena For Full, Unredacted Mueller Report

Nadler: "I have not heard from the Dept. about receiving a less-redacted version of the report. Because Congress requires this material in order to perform our constitutionally-mandated responsibilities, I will issue a subpoena for the full report and the underlying materials."

Read full press release here: https://t.co/eTLiUCZioQ

Andrew
18:21
Trump Asked Top White House Aide to Attest to Something She Didn't Know About

President Trump asked a top White House official to write a letter attesting that he had not directed former national security adviser Michael Flynn to contact the Russian ambassador, the special counsel's report said, despite the official's lack of firsthand knowledge in the events the president asked her to describe.

The report called the incident "irregular" but evidence did not show the president was asking a subordinate to lie, it concluded.

NewsThisSecond
18:00

The report found extensive evidence that a Russian company tied to the Kremlin conducted a disinformation campaign against American voters and that Russian military officials hacked computers of people affiliated with the Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton, Mr. Trump’s electoral rival that year. But it found no evidence that anyone affiliated with the Trump campaign coordinated with those Russian efforts.

NewsThisSecond
17:57
President's efforts to mislead press on the Trump Tower meeting were not criminal

Mueller describes finding at least three occasions when Trump directed Hicks or others not the publicly disclose information about the Trump Tower meeting. Ultimately, however, Mueller determines that Trump’s efforts were only directed at keeping information from the press.

He says they would only amount to obstructive action if there were attempts to withhold the information from congressional investigators or the special counsel’s office.

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