Connect with us

News

Trump UK visit: police to mobilise in numbers not seen since 2011 riots

Police chiefs express concern about plans to deploy officers across UK to contain protests

Published

on

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Trump UK visit: police to mobilise in numbers not seen since 2011 riots” was written by Vikram Dodd Police and crime correspondent, for The Guardian on Monday 9th July 2018 05.00 UTC

Police are planning the biggest mobilisation of officers since the 2011 riots as thousands of people in the UK prepare to protest against the arrival this week of Donald Trump.

Thousands of officers will be moving across the country to contain demonstrations against the US president,who arrives on Thursday and will visit London, Windsor and Scotland during the two-day trip.

One chief constable said the resources that had been asked for were on the scale required “if London was burning down”. Firearms officers, armed counter-terrorism units, public order officers and dog handlers are being deployed for the visit.

Police chiefs said the initial numbers being asked for by the National Police Coordination Centre (NPoCC) were too high and that they fought to cut them.

Several chiefs told the Guardian they were concerned the demands to send personnel to protect Trump added to the pressure to find enough officers to keep their own areas sufficiently safe.

One said: “The more we send there, the less we have for our areas. With the hot weather, if anything kicks off, we are struggling. They cut the officers in the urban areas [biggest forces] and now they need them.”

The original planning was for 6,000 officers, deployed within about 300 police support units, which would comprise one inspector, three sergeants and 18 to 20 constables.

It is understood that about 4,000 officers will be mobilised, to support colleagues in the areas Trump is visiting, and that some forces in other regions have restricted leave so their officers can make up the numbers.

The Police Federation has already acknowledged said that the president’s visit will put “unquestionable pressure” on UK police forces.

Officers will be deployed from areas Trump is not visiting, including Greater Manchester and other forces in the north-west, the north-east, West Midlands, east Midlands and the south-west.

The 43 police forces in England and Wales are supposed to support big surges in demand in other forces through “mutual aid” agreements. One chief constable said: “They are the highest ever requests for mutual aid I have ever seen.

“More mutual aid is being asked for than the [London 2012] Olympics, than for the terrorist attacks last year. I’ve never seen mutual aid requests like this Every force is sending their maximum and above.

“£5m [nationally] is the direct cost. You then have the cost of cancelled rest days. If I cancel a rest day to send an officer, that cost will be covered by the local force.”

Part of the challenge for police is that the president’s itinerary for the UK visit has not been finalised and the policing plans have to remain “fluid”.

Trump will arrive on Air Force1 One at Stansted airport. He will visit London, the prime minister’s country residence in Buckinghamshire as well as Windsor Castle. He will also go to Scotland, where police say their bill could run into millions of pounds.

One chief constable said: “There is concern nationally about how we will keep the show on the road.” Anotheradded: “These are eye-watering numbers. It’s a bit rich for the government to demand this when all they’ve done is cut our numbers since 2010.”

The government reduced police funding by 18% when Theresa May was home secretary in 2010, leading to a reduction of 20,000 officers over the intervening years.

In a statement, the National Police Chiefs’ Council, which houses the NPoCC, said: “UK forces are currently planning a major national policing operation to support the forthcoming visit of US President Donald Trump.

“The NPoCC is in discussions with forces about how the resource requirements of this massive operation will be met. Operational plans are still being determined and we are confident that forces will continue to maintain local policing services.”

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010

Published via the Guardian News Feed plugin for WordPress.

News

Trump Says He’ll Make a ‘Major Announcement’ Saturday Afternoon About Shutdown, Border

Published

on

Washington (AP) — Trump says he will make a ‘major announcement’ on Saturday afternoon about the government shutdown and border security.

Continue Reading

News

Trump Administration Separated Thousands More Migrants Than Previously Known

Published

on

By

The Trump Administration separated thousands more migrant kids from their families at the border than it previously acknowledged, and the separations started months before the policy was announced, according to a federal audit released Thursday morning.

“More children over a longer period of time” were separated at the border than commonly known, an investigator with the Department of Health and Human Services inspector general’s office told reporters Thursday morning.

“How many more children were separated is unknown, by us and HHS” because of failures to track families as they were being separated, he said.

HHS officials involved in caring for the separated children and reunifying families estimated “thousands” of additional children are separated at the border, the inspector general said.

The report sheds new light on the Trump administration’s efforts to deter border crossings by separating migrant families. House Democrats who’ve condemned the separations as inhumane have vowed to investigate the administration’s handling of the policy and its health effects on separated children, and the inspector general said additional investigations are in the works.

The inspector general report said some family separations continued, even after President Donald Trump in June 2018 ended the policy amid uproar and a federal court ordered his administration to reunify the families. The June 2018 court order called on the administration to reunify about 2,500 separated children in government custody. Most of those families were reunited within 30 days.

However, HHS received at least 118 separated children between July and early November, according to the report. DHS provided “limited” information about the reason for those separations. In slightly more than half of those cases, border officials cited the parent’s criminal history as a reason to separate the families, although they did not always provide details. The court order requiring reunifications said family separations should only occur if border officials could specify when parents posed possible dangers to children or were otherwise unfit to care for them, the inspector general noted.

Federal investigators said they had no details about how many of the “thousands of separated children” who entered the care of HHS before the June 2018 court order had been reunited.

“We have no information about the status of the children who were released prior to the court order,” Maxwell told reporters. [POLITICO]

Continue Reading

News

Prince Phillip Involved in Car Crash

Published

on

#BREAKING Duke of Edinburgh involved in car crash near Sandringham Estate but not injured, Buckingham Palace says.

Continue Reading

Popular

Copyright © 2018 News This Second