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Fact Check: Sanders’ Misleading Wage Claim

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Sen. Bernie Sanders claims that “the average American worker today, despite the strong economy, is not getting ahead.” Not so. Hourly wages have been rising faster than inflation for years, and that trend has continued under President Donald Trump.

“Real” (inflation-adjusted) hourly wages for production and nonsupervisory employees have gone up nearly 0.8 percent since Donald Trump took office, after rising 2.8 percent during Obama’s eight years in office.

To be sure, the rise has gone in fits and starts. Sanders seized a hiccup in the long-term trend during an interview with CNN’s Chris Cuomo on June 7, when he said “real wage increases for the average American worker … last year” amounted to “zero.”

Sanders, June 7: [D]o you know what the increase in wages — real wage increases for the average American worker was last year?

Cuomo: About 3 percent.

Sanders: Zero. Not a — nope. It kept pace with inflation for the average American worker. It didn’t make a nickel more after you account for inflation. …

So, the bottom line is, the average American worker today, despite the strong economy, is not getting ahead.

Asked for backup, Sanders’ press office pointed to a May 10 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics that shows the real hourly wage for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls did not go up at all between April 2017 and April 2018. (See Table A-2.)

But that is no longer correct. Figures downloaded from the BLS website, which are based on slightly more recent and extensive data than in the press release, show a 0.1 percent increase in real hourly wages in that 12-month period. Even that figure remains preliminary, and subject to revision for another month or so.

The larger fact is that real hourly wages have been generally rising since hitting a low point in 1994-95. As of April, they were 19 percent higher than that low point (though still 1.5 percent below the highest point reached in 1972).

Furthermore, paychecks are rising even faster than hourly wage rates, because part-time workers are finding more work and full-time workers are getting more overtime pay. Inflation-adjusted weeklyearnings for production and nonsupervisory employees have risen 1.4 percent under Trump, after rising 3.7 percent under Obama.

Looking at all private-sector workers (including managers and supervisory workers), real weekly earnings went up 4 percent during Obama’s eight years, and have gone up another 1.1 percent under Trump, according to the most recent figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Those figures are a bit volatile because the Consumer Price Index can fluctuate a bit month to month. During Trump’s time in office, for example, the 12-month change in real hourly earnings has fluctuated between a decrease of 0.4 percent (during the 12 months ending February 2017) and an increase of 0.8 percent (during the 12-month period ending June 2017).

That’s mainly due to the yo-yo effect seen in gasoline prices (which make up more than 5 percent of the CPI) and sometimes food prices. And as we all know, gasoline prices have been on a tear in recent months, but can drop almost as quickly as they rise. The Energy Information Administration expects them to drop in September, after the summer driving season is over.

Sanders is free to argue that the rise in real wages and earnings is too slow, and that the average worker isn’t getting ahead fast enough. That’s a matter of opinion. And he’d be correct to say that real hourly wages haven’t yet recovered to the peak levels seen in the early 1970s. But he’s wrong to seize on a monthly blip in the statistics to support a misleading claim that they are not getting ahead at all.

 

NewsThisSecond therefore rates this claim as mostly false. As the main point is misleading.

(Fact Check.org)

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Trump Says He’ll Make a ‘Major Announcement’ Saturday Afternoon About Shutdown, Border

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Washington (AP) — Trump says he will make a ‘major announcement’ on Saturday afternoon about the government shutdown and border security.

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Trump Administration Separated Thousands More Migrants Than Previously Known

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The Trump Administration separated thousands more migrant kids from their families at the border than it previously acknowledged, and the separations started months before the policy was announced, according to a federal audit released Thursday morning.

“More children over a longer period of time” were separated at the border than commonly known, an investigator with the Department of Health and Human Services inspector general’s office told reporters Thursday morning.

“How many more children were separated is unknown, by us and HHS” because of failures to track families as they were being separated, he said.

HHS officials involved in caring for the separated children and reunifying families estimated “thousands” of additional children are separated at the border, the inspector general said.

The report sheds new light on the Trump administration’s efforts to deter border crossings by separating migrant families. House Democrats who’ve condemned the separations as inhumane have vowed to investigate the administration’s handling of the policy and its health effects on separated children, and the inspector general said additional investigations are in the works.

The inspector general report said some family separations continued, even after President Donald Trump in June 2018 ended the policy amid uproar and a federal court ordered his administration to reunify the families. The June 2018 court order called on the administration to reunify about 2,500 separated children in government custody. Most of those families were reunited within 30 days.

However, HHS received at least 118 separated children between July and early November, according to the report. DHS provided “limited” information about the reason for those separations. In slightly more than half of those cases, border officials cited the parent’s criminal history as a reason to separate the families, although they did not always provide details. The court order requiring reunifications said family separations should only occur if border officials could specify when parents posed possible dangers to children or were otherwise unfit to care for them, the inspector general noted.

Federal investigators said they had no details about how many of the “thousands of separated children” who entered the care of HHS before the June 2018 court order had been reunited.

“We have no information about the status of the children who were released prior to the court order,” Maxwell told reporters. [POLITICO]

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Prince Phillip Involved in Car Crash

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#BREAKING Duke of Edinburgh involved in car crash near Sandringham Estate but not injured, Buckingham Palace says.

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