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Shots reported near YouTube headquarters in California

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Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “YouTube shooting: one dead after incident at California headquarters” was written by Olivia Solon in San Francisco, for theguardian.com on Tuesday 3rd April 2018 21.47 UTC

One person is dead and four wounded after a shooting at YouTube’s headquarters in San Bruno, California, police say.

The San Bruno police chief said that the fatality, a woman, could be the shooter and appeared to die as the result of a self-inflicted gunshot.

Employees posted about barricading themselves inside rooms as police and ambulances arrived at the scene.

“Heard shots and saw people running while at my desk. Now barricaded inside a room with coworkers,” Vadim Lavrusik, a YouTube employee, posted to Twitter.

A spokesman for San Francisco General Hospital said that the hospital had received three patients, one in critical condition. The patients are a 32-year-old woman in serious condition, a 27-year-old woman in fair condition, and a 36-year-old man in critical condition. The nearby Stanford hospital is expecting four to five patients of unknown condition, a hospital spokeswoman Lisa Kim said.

Zach Vorhies, a senior software engineer at YouTube, told the Guardian that he was at his desk when the fire alarm went off. As he passed through an interior courtyard between the main building and the parking garage he saw a man on the ground with what appears to be a bullet wound to the stomach. He heard what he assumed to be the shooter shout “come and get me!” and saw police with assault weapons responding.

Project manager Todd Sherman said he was sitting in a meeting when he heard people running to leave the building. Upon exiting the room he saw “blood drips on the floor and stairs” and heard people say there was a potential shooter before he managed to escape the building.

“Police cruisers pull up, hopped out with rifles ready and I told them where the situation was as I headed down the street to meet up with a couple team members,” he said.

Aerial footage shot by CBS News shows staff leaving the building with their hands in the air. Offices of other companies nearby were also on lockdown.

“My stomach sinks with yet another active shooter alert,” said California senator Dianne Feinstein. “I’m praying for the safety of everyone at YouTube headquarters.”

The incident comes during a renewed debate over American gun control laws, following a 14 February mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 students and teachers dead. Hundreds of thousands of Americans demonstrated for stricter gun laws on 24 March in Washington and across the country.

With Republicans in Congress blocking any new gun control legislation, much of the activism after the Parkland shooting has shifted to the private sector, with advocates pressuring corporations to drop discounts for National Rifle Association members, change their policies for selling certain weapons and accessories, or divest from companies that manufacture firearms. When a Fox News host tweeted disparagingly about a Parkland activist not getting into his top colleges, the 17-year-old successfully called for advertisers to boycott her show.

YouTube is one of the companies that introduced new policies after the Parkland shooting. In late March, it quietly debuted restrictions on some gun-related video content, Bloomberg News reported, including prohibiting videos promoting the sale of bump stocks or instructing users how to manufacture firearms or high-capacity magazines

The National Shooting Sports Foundation, which represents gun manufacturers, called YouTube’s new policy “worrisome” in a statement to Bloomberg News in late March.

YouTube has also come under scrutiny for the way its platforms have been used after mass shootings to spread conspiracy theories that mass shootings are hoaxes perpetrated to advance gun control, and that grieving survivors and family members of shooting victims who appear in the media are “crisis actors”.

  • Lois Beckett contributed reporting

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010

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Bo Dukes Sentenced To 25 Years In Prison For Covering Up Death of Tara Grinstead

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ABBEVILLE, Ga. (AP) — A man convicted of helping hide the death of a missing Georgia teacher has been sentenced to 25 years in prison.

News outlets reported that 34-year-old Bo Dukes was sentenced Friday morning in court in Abbeville.

Dukes was convicted Thursday night of lying to investigators about the 2005 death of Tara Grinstead. The high school history teacher’s body was burned to ash and bone fragments in a pecan orchard.

What happened to the woman wasn’t revealed until Dukes and another man were arrested in 2017.

Dukes was convicted of two counts of making a false statement, hindering the arrest of a criminal and concealing a death.

His co-defendant, Ryan Alexander Duke, is charged with murder in Grinstead’s death and is scheduled for trial April 1 in Irwin County.

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US Supreme Court Agrees To Decide Whether Lee Boyd Malvo Gets A New Sentence

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March 18 (UPI) — The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether a gunman in the 2002 Beltway Sniper case should receive a new sentence because he was a teenager at the time.

The random shootings terrorized the Washington, D.C., area in September and October 2002 and killed 10 people. Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad were ultimately captured and convicted of the sniper killings. Muhammad was executed in 2009 and Malvo is serving six consecutive life sentences. At the time of the shootings, Malvo was 17.

The Supreme Court issued a writ of certiorari Monday to hear the appeal next term.

At issue is a 2012 Supreme Court ruling that said juveniles cannot be given mandatory life-without-parole sentences unless they committed murder or were determined permanently incorrigible.

A Virginia court last year vacated Malvo’s sentences and asked a trial court to rule on whether his crimes reflect permanent incorrigibility or “the transient nature of youth.”

Malvo is now 34 years old.

A U.S. Court of Appeals panel called the Beltway shootings “the most heinous, random acts of premeditated violence conceivable, destroying lives and families and terrorizing the entire Washington D.C., metropolitan area for over six weeks, instilling mortal fear daily in the citizens of that community.”

The judges said, “Malvo was 17 years old when he committed the murders, and he now has the retroactive benefit of new constitutional rules that treat juveniles differently for sentencing.”

Malvo faces life without parole in Maryland, where he killed six people. That sentence was upheld in 2017 and is pending at the state Supreme Court. Muhammad, who was 25 years older than Malvo, smuggled him into the country illegally from Antigua.

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First Murder Trial in Tara Grinstead Case Begins

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ABBEVILLE, Ga. (AP) — A Georgia man is standing trial on charges that he helped conceal the death of a high school teacher who disappeared more than 13 years ago.

Bo Dukes is charged with concealing a death, hindering the apprehension of a felon and lying to police after Tara Grinstead vanished from her home in rural Irwin County in October 2005. His trial began Monday in neighboring Wilcox County.

Prosecutors say Dukes’ friend, Ryan Duke, killed Grinstead and enlisted Dukes’ to help burn her body. Both men were arrested in 2017. Duke is charged with murder. His trial is scheduled to start April 1.

John McCullough testified Tuesday that he befriended Dukes during Army basic training in 2006. He said Dukes confessed to him a few weeks after they met.

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