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Matt Lauer had something to say to the news that Hoda Kotb is replacing him on “TODAY”

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The Today Show Gallery of Olympians Matt Lauer offered his congratulations to Hoda Kotb after it was revealed that NBC News decided to promote her to Savannah Guthrie’s co-anchor. The news of Kotb’s promotion made headlines early January 2 and between segments with Guthrie and her fourth hour show with Kathie Lee Gifford, Kotb talked about…



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Oprah Winfrey takes on sexual predators in Golden Globes speech: ‘Their time is up’

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Oprah Winfrey accepted her Cecil B. DeMille Award on Sunday night at the Golden Globes with a message to the young girls watching: “A new day is on the horizon.”

The media mogul’s message came during a Golden Globes ceremony notable for being the first major award show since Hollywood first began addressing rampant sexual harassment against women in the entertainment industry and beyond.

This year’s ceremony was one of the most political yet and saw the red carpet awash with A-list actresses wearing black.

Some of the biggest names brought with them activists for gender and racial justice, including #MeToo founder Tarana Burke, who started the hashtag campaign which exposed the scale of sexual harassment against women worldwide.

Part of the mission of anti-sexual harassment group Time’s Up, which led the night’s all-black fashion movement, has been to raise awareness of sexual harassment occurring outside of Hollywood.

Winfrey made the same point in her speech, saying sexual harassment “transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics or work place.” Read the full speech.

“So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue,” she said. “They’re the women whose names we’ll never know.”

Winfrey said she has been “inspired” by “all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories.”

In her speech, Winfrey highlighted the story of Recy Taylor, a black woman whose 1944 rape by six men did not lead to any convictions. Taylor passed away last month at the age of 97.

“She lived — as we all have lived — in a culture broken by brutally powerful men,” Winfrey said. “For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dared to speak their truth to the power of those men, but their time is up.”

Her statement prompted enthusiastic applause from Hollywood’s elite and shouts of approval from women and men in the room.

The audience rose to their feet and remained standing as Winfrey sent a message to “all the girls” watching her speech.

“I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say “Me too” again.”

‘A new day’
The Cecil B. DeMille Award is given “to a talented individual who has made an incredible impact on the world of entertainment,” according to the Hollywood Foreign Press.

Past honorees include Sidney Poitier, Barbra Streisand, Steven Spielberg, and George Clooney.

Winfrey is the first black woman to receive the honor. She was announced as a recipient back in December.

“I want all the girls watching here, now to know that a new day is on the horizon,” she said. “And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight — and some pretty phenomenal men — fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say #MeToo again.”

Winfrey’s speech comes one year after Meryl Streep used her acceptance speech for the same award to deliver a blistering criticism of then president-elect Donald Trump.

Winfrey will next be seen in Ava DuVernay’s “A Wrinkle in Time,” which hits theaters in March.

Full Transcript

In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother’s house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th Academy Awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history: “The winner is Sidney Poitier.” Up to the stage came the most elegant man I had ever seen. I remember his tie was white, and of course his skin was black, and I had never seen a black man being celebrated like that. I tried many, many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl, a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people’s houses. But all I can do is quote and say that the explanation in Sidney’s performance in “Lilies of the Field”:
“Amen, amen, amen, amen.”

In 1982, Sidney received the Cecil B. DeMille award right here at the Golden Globes and it is not lost on me that at this moment, there are some little girls watching as I become the first black woman to be given this same award. It is an honor — it is an honor and it is a privilege to share the evening with all of them and also with the incredible men and women who have inspired me, who challenged me, who sustained me and made my journey to this stage possible. Dennis Swanson who took a chance on me for “A.M. Chicago.” Quincy Jones who saw me on that show and said to Steven Spielberg, “Yes, she is Sophia in ‘The Color Purple.'” Gayle who has been the definition of what a friend is, and Stedman who has been my rock — just a few to name.

I want to thank the Hollywood Foreign Press Association because we all know the press is under siege these days. We also know it’s the insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice. To — to tyrants and victims, and secrets and lies. I want to say that I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times, which brings me to this: what I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have. And I’m especially proud and inspired by all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories. Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year we became the story.

But it’s not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It’s one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace. So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue. They’re the women whose names we’ll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and they’re in academia, engineering, medicine, and science. They’re part of the world of tech and politics and business. They’re our athletes in the Olympics and they’re our soldiers in the military.

And there’s someone else, Recy Taylor, a name I know and I think you should know, too. In 1944, Recy Taylor was a young wife and mother walking home from a church service she’d attended in Abbeville, Alabama, when she was abducted by six armed white men, raped, and left blindfolded by the side of the road coming home from church. They threatened to kill her if she ever told anyone, but her story was reported to the NAACP where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case and together they sought justice. But justice wasn’t an option in the era of Jim Crow. The men who tried to destroy her were never persecuted. Recy Taylor died ten days ago, just shy of her 98th birthday. She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men. For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up.

Their time is up. And I just hope — I just hope that Recy Taylor died knowing that her truth, like the truth of so many other women who were tormented in those years, and even now tormented, goes marching on. It was somewhere in Rosa Parks’ heart almost 11 years later, when she made the decision to stay seated on that bus in Montgomery, and it’s here with every woman who chooses to say, “Me too.” And every man — every man who chooses to listen.

In my career, what I’ve always tried my best to do, whether on television or through film, is to say something about how men and women really behave. To say how we experience shame, how we love and how we rage, how we fail, how we retreat, persevere and how we overcome. I’ve interviewed and portrayed people who’ve withstood some of the ugliest things life can throw at you, but the one quality all of them seem to share is an ability to maintain hope for a brighter morning, even during our darkest nights. So I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say “Me too” again.

 

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ABC planning ‘Scandal,’ ‘How to Get Away with Murder’ crossover episodes

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(CNN) — Annalise Keating and Olivia Pope are women who have blazed their own paths, but those paths are now going to collide.

ABC confirmed Wednesday that “Scandal” and “How to Get Away with Murder” will stage crossover episodes that will see the characters played by Viola Davis and Kerry Washington share the small screen for the first time.

There is currently no air date for the episodes.

Hey Ms @violadavis ❤️ check it out. This spot look familiar?! Where are you?

A post shared by Kerry Washington (@kerrywashington) on

 

Washington and Davis first broke the news on their verified social media accounts, posting photos from the sets of the shows they are visiting.

Davis shared a photo of herself on the White House set of “Scandal” and Washington from a courthouse corridor featured on “How To Get Away with Murder.”

“This spot look familiar?!” Washington wrote in her photo caption, directed at Davis.

Hey @KerryWashington, guess where I am?!

A post shared by Viola Davis (@violadavis) on

“Scandal” creator Shonda Rhimes, meanwhile, shared a small sneak peek of the script, featuring the moment when the two main characters first come face to face.

“Scandal” and “How to Get Away with Murder” return with new episodes January 18.

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Kevin Hart apologizes to wife, kids for ‘mistakes’

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NEW YORK (AP) — Kevin Hart has publicly apologized to his pregnant wife and his kids for what he described as a “bad error in judgment.”

The comedian and box office star, looking morose, posted a video to Instagram on Saturday in which he said he wasn’t perfect and recently made poor decisions.

He said there was “no excuses” but added that someone was trying to seek financial gain over his mistakes, and he’d rather confess than let that happen.

Hart married wife Eniko last year. She is expecting their first child soon. He has two children from a previous marriage.

Earlier this summer, a video emerged of Hart looking cozy with a brunette in the back of a car, but he laughed off any suggestions of infidelity in an Instagram post.

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