Connect with us

Published

on

An FBI raid in Sterling, Virginia, on Friday night was part of an investigation into a man who allegedly supported ISIS, according to an FBI affidavit obtained by CNN affiliate WJLA.

During the raid, the suspect, Sean Andrew Duncan, attempted to destroy evidence, the criminal complaint, which WJLA obtained from the FBI, alleges.

When agents arrived at Duncan’s home on Friday, he “ran out the back door, barefoot, and with something in his hand,” the affidavit alleges. Duncan then threw “a plastic baggie” over their heads, which, when recovered, was found to contain “a memory chip stored within a thumb drive that had been snapped into pieces, and placed in a liquid substance that produced frothy white bubbles.”

Duncan had recently traveled to Turkey with his wife, but was deported to the United States, according to the affidavit. In December 2017, a detained ISIS recruiter showed the FBI a list of handwritten names and phone numbers, which contained Duncan’s information, the document alleges.

According to the affidavit, authorities searched Duncan’s cell phone over the summer and found “numerous internet searches for ISIS-related materials,” including information on ISIS attacks, weapons, body armor, surveillance and defense tactics, and paintball venues.

Efforts to reach Duncan or a representative of his for comment over the weekend were unsuccessful.

The affidavit alleges an unnamed co-conspirator told the FBI in July 2017 that Duncan had connected with her on social media and expressed an interest in joining ISIS and conducting a terrorist attack in the United States; he also asked her to travel to Syria with him and his wife, but she declined, the document says.

In August 2017, an undercover FBI employee identified an encrypted messaging account associated with Duncan and, posing as a co-conspirator, used the account to ask Duncan if he had any connections in Syria, the affidavit alleges; Duncan answered, “No a couple have been marytred (sic),” the document says.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Crime

ATLANTA POLICE OFFICER SHOOTS A MAN DEAD AT A FAST-FOOD DRIVE-THRU

An Atlanta police officer shot and killed a man at a Wendy’s drive-thru Friday night.

Published

on

 (CNN) — An Atlanta police officer shot and killed a man at a Wendy’s drive-thru Friday night after he resisted arrest and struggled for an officer’s Taser, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said in a statement.

The GBI identified the slain man as Rayshard Brooks, 27, of Atlanta.

The killing comes amid global protests and discussion of police use of force following the death of George Floyd last month in custody in Minneapolis. Atlanta has seen frequent protests, including some that turned violent.

Six Atlanta Police Department officers were facing charges of using excessive force during one, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard announced June 2. Two of the officers were fired by Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms.

Friday, officers responded to a call at 10:33 p.m. about a man sleeping in a parked vehicle in the drive-thru, causing other customers to drive around it, the GBI said in a statement.

Police gave Brooks a field sobriety test, which he failed, the GBI said. He resisted arrest and struggled with officers, the GBI said.

An officer drew his Taser and, witnesses said, the man grabbed it, the statement said. An officer then shot him.

Brooks was taken to a hospital, where he died, the statement said.

One officer was treated for an injury and released, the GBI said.

The GBI is investigating at the request of the APD, the statement said. Once completed, the case will be turned over to prosecutors for review.

CNN has reached out to the APD, GBI and the mayor’s office but they have not responded.

CNN affiliate WSB reports this is the 48th police shooting the GBI has investigated in 2020

Continue Reading

Crime

Bo Dukes Sentenced To 25 Years In Prison For Covering Up Death of Tara Grinstead

Published

on

By

ABBEVILLE, Ga. (AP) — A man convicted of helping hide the death of a missing Georgia teacher has been sentenced to 25 years in prison.

News outlets reported that 34-year-old Bo Dukes was sentenced Friday morning in court in Abbeville.

Dukes was convicted Thursday night of lying to investigators about the 2005 death of Tara Grinstead. The high school history teacher’s body was burned to ash and bone fragments in a pecan orchard.

What happened to the woman wasn’t revealed until Dukes and another man were arrested in 2017.

Dukes was convicted of two counts of making a false statement, hindering the arrest of a criminal and concealing a death.

His co-defendant, Ryan Alexander Duke, is charged with murder in Grinstead’s death and is scheduled for trial April 1 in Irwin County.

Continue Reading

Crime

US Supreme Court Agrees To Decide Whether Lee Boyd Malvo Gets A New Sentence

Published

on

By

March 18 (UPI) — The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether a gunman in the 2002 Beltway Sniper case should receive a new sentence because he was a teenager at the time.

The random shootings terrorized the Washington, D.C., area in September and October 2002 and killed 10 people. Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad were ultimately captured and convicted of the sniper killings. Muhammad was executed in 2009 and Malvo is serving six consecutive life sentences. At the time of the shootings, Malvo was 17.

The Supreme Court issued a writ of certiorari Monday to hear the appeal next term.

At issue is a 2012 Supreme Court ruling that said juveniles cannot be given mandatory life-without-parole sentences unless they committed murder or were determined permanently incorrigible.

A Virginia court last year vacated Malvo’s sentences and asked a trial court to rule on whether his crimes reflect permanent incorrigibility or “the transient nature of youth.”

Malvo is now 34 years old.

A U.S. Court of Appeals panel called the Beltway shootings “the most heinous, random acts of premeditated violence conceivable, destroying lives and families and terrorizing the entire Washington D.C., metropolitan area for over six weeks, instilling mortal fear daily in the citizens of that community.”

The judges said, “Malvo was 17 years old when he committed the murders, and he now has the retroactive benefit of new constitutional rules that treat juveniles differently for sentencing.”

Malvo faces life without parole in Maryland, where he killed six people. That sentence was upheld in 2017 and is pending at the state Supreme Court. Muhammad, who was 25 years older than Malvo, smuggled him into the country illegally from Antigua.

Continue Reading

Popular

Copyright © 2018 News This Second